Chromium Picolinate

Chromium Picolinate Tablets

Chromium Picolinate Supplements help raise the amount of chromium present in the body. Small levels of dietary chromium are essential for normal metabolic function. Chromium-deficient patients have problems with blood sugar regulation and other essential metabolic processes. Chromium picolinate is a semi-popular supplement for athletic training. Chromium Picolinate supplements are also occasionally used in Naturopathic medicine for the treatment of some skin diseases, such as acne.

Chromium Picolinate Structure
Chromium Picolinate Structure

Chromium is naturally present in small concentrations in many unprocessed foods and most people are not chromium deficient. There is little evidence that dietary supplementation with Chromium Picolinate has significant effects in people who already have healthy levels of chromium. Since there is a link between blood glucose (sugar) levels and inflammation, people have attempted to use chromium picolinate to improve their acne symptoms. The idea being that an increase in the amount of Chromium Picolinate will decrease the amount of blood glucose, which leads to decreased inflammation. This would then cause an improvement in acne symptoms. However, there does not appear to be any reliable evidence that indicates Chromium Picolinate supplements are effective as an acne treatment.

Chromium Picolinate Images

References

Chromium Picolinate @ Wikipedia
Acne vulgaris: nutritional factors may be influencing psychological sequelae. Katzman, et al. 2007.
The chromium controversy. Cronin. 2004.
The effect of chromium supplementation on polycystic ovary syndrome in adolescents. Amr, et al. 2015.
The Effects of Chromium Supplementation on Endocrine Profiles, Biomarkers of Inflammation, and Oxidative Stress in Women with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: a Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial. Jamilian, et al. 2016.
The potential value and toxicity of chromium picolinate as a nutritional supplement, weight loss agent and muscle development agent. Vincent. 2003.